Driving Tips To Keep Your Business Safe

Whether your drivers are delivering products to your customers, getting service providers where they need to go or traveling for marketing purposes, having employees driving for your company automatically increases your risk exposure. Teaching drivers to be safe on the road, and taking measures on your end to increase driver safety, will help lessen that risk and improve your image with customers and the public. Here are some tips to help make driver safety a priority for your company.

Keep Up With Vehicle Maintenance

An unmaintained vehicle is an unsafe vehicle. Keep your vehicles well maintained, and they will serve your drivers more reliably. Keeping all systems on the vehicle properly maintained will prevent accidents that occur because a system or component fails while the driver is on the road. When maintaining vehicles, don't neglect the tires. Sufficient tread and tire pressure can help prevent a number of accidents.


Driving Safety First Aid Store offers training products on Driving Safety to provide the information employees need to drive cars, vans and small trucks safely, both on and off the job. Topics covered in these products include: Inspecting the vehicle, Adjusting seats, mirrors and other equipment, Mental preparation and concentration, Passing another vehicle, Sharing the road with trucks and buses, School bus encounters, Driving at night, Adverse weather conditions, skidding and hydroplaning, Distracted driving, Road rage, What to do in case of an accident. Driving Safety

First Aid Store offers training products on Driving Safety to provide the information employees need to drive cars, vans and small trucks safely, both on and off the job. Topics covered in these products include: Inspecting the vehicle, Adjusting seats, mirrors and other equipment, Mental preparation and concentration, Passing another vehicle, Sharing the road with trucks and buses, School bus encounters, Driving at night, Adverse weather conditions, skidding and hydroplaning, Distracted driving, Road rage, What to do in case of an accident.

Insist on Safe Driving Practices

Make safe driving practices an essential part of your business operations. Common safe driving practices of which you may need to instruct your drivers include:

• Driving at a safe distance. Two to three seconds behind the car in front is necessary, especially for large trucks that are heavier than most cars.

• Use a safe rate of speed. Speeding is a major risk, contributing to 45 percent of fatality crashes and nearly two-thirds of injury crashes, so teach your drivers to honor the speed limits.

• Pull over when needed. Whether messing with a GPS or changing media on an on-board entertainment system, pull over when your eyes can't be on the road.

Teach these safety tips to your drivers, and then expect your drivers to follow them.

Use Technology to Help

Vehicle technology is constantly changing, and many of those changes benefit driver safety. Modern antilock braking systems, for instance, keep wheels from locking when braking quickly. Electronic stability control systems allow for individual wheels to brake separately when the vehicle starts to spin out of control. Weather alert systems can provide drivers details about upcoming weather that could impact the safety of their trip.

Technology that comes with the vehicle is your first line of defense. You can also install GPS fleet tracking systems to keep tabs on driver behavior and location, and thus improve safety even more.

Monitor the Weather

The weather can change your driving tactics, as weather conditions can quickly turn a safe road into a slippery hazard. According to the National Safety Council, most drivers need a three-second following distance for normal driving conditions — that needs to increase when rain, fog, snow, smoke or ice are present. Reduce speed so you have enough time to stop when weather is a factor.

WEA – Wireless Emergency Alerts

Drivers may not be aware of all of the risks of weather, so you may need to provide some education. Specifically, many drivers are unaware that the most dangerous period during rain is when the road first gets wet — not after the road is soaked. New moisture causes oil on the road to “float,” creating a slick surface that increases the chances of hydroplaning. Teaching drivers about these risks will help them reduce speed and stay a safe distance from other vehicles when conditions warrant.

Your drivers are the first face of your company that many customers and potential customers will see. Driver safety is paramount to your company's success. Not only does it make a good impression, but it also lowers your company’s financial risk — so spend some time teaching your drivers how to be safe on the road.

Author bio: Robert J. Hall is president of Track Your Truck, a leader in GPS vehicle tracking device and software for small and midsized companies.

First Published in the Auto Safety category of the First Aid Blog

Explore Safety Topics...

AED
CPR
OSHA.com Online Safety Training
SafetyPoster.com - Best Selection of Safety Posters Online

Safety Job Finder powered by CareerBuilder.com






Advanced Job Search »

ADVERTISEMENT