Electrical Safety for Construction Site Workers

Whether renovating, tearing down or building from the ground up, construction sites are covered with electrical hazards. It is incumbent on workers to know risks and proper precautions. It is important for you and your coworkers to have access to proper safety equipment and basic safety training.


Electricity is all around us. It lights up our homes... powers much of the machinery and equipment that we use... and runs many of our tools. We are so used to it, most employees "take it for granted." Yet electricity can also be dangerous. Employees need to know how electricity works, and what they should do to protect themselves from its hazards. Our training products on "Electrical Safety" remind employees about electrical hazards they may face in their jobs, and provides the information they need to work safely around electricity. This program will also assist in satisfying the OSHA training requirements under 29 CFR Part 1910.331 (Electrical Safety Standard) for "non-qualified" employees. Topics covered in these products include:     How electricity works.     Fuses and circuit breakers.     Grounding and GFIs.     Safe work practices.     Outlets, plugs and extension cords.     Working with electrical equipment.     Using ladders around electricity.     Electrical emergencies.     and more.

Electricity is all around us. It lights up our homes… powers much of the machinery and equipment that we use… and runs many of our tools. We are so used to it, most employees “take it for granted.” Yet electricity can also be dangerous. Employees need to know how electricity works, and what they should do to protect themselves from its hazards.
Our training products on “Electrical Safety” remind employees about electrical hazards they may face in their jobs, and provides the information they need to work safely around electricity. This program will also assist in satisfying the OSHA training requirements under 29 CFR Part 1910.331 (Electrical Safety Standard) for “non-qualified” employees. Topics covered in these products include:
How electricity works.
Fuses and circuit breakers.
Grounding and GFIs.
Safe work practices.
Outlets, plugs and extension cords.
Working with electrical equipment.
Using ladders around electricity.
Electrical emergencies.
and more.


Safety Equipment

To perform safety on the job, your construction site should be well stocked with the following pieces of safety equipment.

Personal protection: In many ways, personal protection is more important than any other piece of safety equipment because it directly protects you against electrical mishaps. Your required amount of personal protection depends on your potential exposure to electricity. Electrical gloves and footwear provide basic safety and potential life saving protection, such as protection from contact with an unseen wire behind a wall. When working with wiring or working in close contact with electrical equipment, take extra precautions by using a face shield, protective eyewear, fire-resistant helmet and protective earmuffs.

Testing equipment: You should never handle wiring or electrical equipment without proper knowledge. Electrical power testing equipment provides crucial protection from unwanted and potential deadly surprises. Your worksite should be stocked with voltage detectors, receptacle testers and clamp meters.

Cord protectors: Safe extension cords and outlet strips are a good start to safety practices. For additional precautions, your construction site should use cable covers and cord protectors. Power cords surround workers and it is easy to overlook cracks exposing wires; therefore, a damaged power cord can be deadly. For safety purposes, use sturdy floor cable protectors. Be sure these protectors are highly visible to prevent tripping on the worksite.

Voltage regulators and circuit breakers: These are key pieces of safety equipment that prevent a problem from getting worse. You should always use a surge protector to shut off the worksite’s power supply during an emergency. Additionally, a voltage regulator prevents equipment damage over time. It also prevents equipment damage during a surge of electricity.


Safety Training

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Safety equipment is crucial on a construction site. Without proper safety training, this equipment can only get you so far. Below are a few key areas in which you should be properly trained for safety on a construction site.


Precautions: Some electrical hazards are out of your control while some are within your control. Reduce your risk of electrocution by taking the right precautions. For example, know where electrical wiring will be an issue on a construction site and label it for precaution measures. Likewise, use ground fault circuit interrupters for all receptacle outlets to prevent electrical shock.

Equipment use: As a construction worker, it is easy to become comfortable with your equipment resulting in improper use of tools or practicing unknown hazards. Proper training can help identify unknown improper shortcuts and reduce the risk of equipment-related electrocution. Similarly, make sure coworkers know the proper way to use every tool especially in direct electrical work.

Identifying problems: Construction sites are dangerous. Workers should practice identifying abnormalities and other hazards. For example, certain electrical problems will produce a distinct smell, or an overloaded electrical panel might hum differently than normal. Make a safety checklist and incorporate it into your daily routine. Workers should feel comfortable alerting a supervisor when exposed wires are present. Practicing overly cautious safety measures can save your life.

Response: Do you know what to do if you spot a hazard? Do you know what to do if a coworker has suffered an electric shock? Being prepared to properly respond to safety situations is crucial. This includes knowing whether you are qualified to address the issue. If you spot a hazard, alert a supervisor and warn all coworkers about the issue to ensure proper precautions are taken. If a coworker suffers a shock on the job, make sure you have the right emergency phone numbers and immediate access to a phone. Also, know who is on staff and qualified to provide first aid response.


Every Construction Site Needs Contractors & Construction Site First Aid Kits for OSHA COmpliacne

Every Construction Site Needs Contractors & Construction Site First Aid Kits for OSHA COmpliacne

First Aid: It is important for you and your coworkers to understand the basics of first aid. Every construction site should have a comprehensive first aid kit, including items such as burn creams and bandages. In some cases, a defibrillator is important to have on site. It can mean the difference between life and death for a shock victim. It is important for all workers to know the location of first aid equipment and have access to it.


Author Bio:

This article was written by Minerallac. A manufacturer and distributor of electrical construction hardware.

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